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Genital herpes doesn’t show up on a test right away. It's important to wait a few weeks for the window period to pass.

 
 


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Know the Genital Herpes Window Period

Genital herpes can be detected as early as 3 weeks after an exposure, but this STD can take anywhere from 4 to 6 weeks to show up on a test. Testing too early can lead to inaccurate test results, so it’s important to allow the body enough time to produce a detectable level of antibodies.

Genital Herpes Testing After an Exposure

If you are concerned about a specific exposure, it’s imperative to wait at about 4 to 6 weeks before testing. If you tested before the recommended window period and returned negative, retesting is advised at 3 months for the most accurate answers. Genital herpes usually doesn’t produce symptoms, so testing is the only way to obtain a diagnosis.

Getting a Genital Herpes Test

Many times, genital herpes doesn’t produce noticeable symptoms, so don’t wait for sores to crop up before testing. Taking a genital herpes test is a good idea after a possible exposure, or you just want to know your status. getSTDtested.com uses the IgG antibody test for genital herpes testing.

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Why Should I Test for Genital Herpes?

Genital herpes is common and most cases go undiagnosed.

Genital Herpes is Common

Genital herpes is one of the most common STDs: 1 in 6 people ages 14 to 49 living in the U.S. has genital herpes. This virus is more common in women, affecting 1 in 5 women compared to 1 in 9 men. Yet, up to 90% of those infected are unaware of their status. While this STD is widespread, it fortunately it does not pose many long-term side effects.

Genital Herpes Symptoms can be Nonexistent

This is why genital herpes is so widespread. Often times, the infection is asymptomatic, meaning there are no blisters, sores or lesions. Sometimes, symptoms of genital herpes are mild and vague, causing the STD to be mistaken for other common conditions such as jock itch or a yeast infection. A blood test for herpes can diagnose a herpes infection with or without an active outbreak.

Genital Herpes Testing Provides Answers

If concerned about genital herpes, STD testing can provide answers. Be sure to wait until the window period for genital herpes has passed. Wait at least three to six weeks to take a genital herpes test, and if negative, test again after six weeks.

Accurate Genital Herpes Testing

Provided you waited until the herpes window period passed, a genital herpes test is very accurate. This IgG antibody test is 99% accurate. When testing for this STD, it is recommended to test for both oral herpes (HSV-1) and genital herpes (HSV-2), since both strains have similar symptoms and can be cross-transferred during oral sex.

Genital Herpes Resources




I didn't have symptoms, but I wanted to know if I had genital herpes. I had a full STD testing panel done & it gave me the peace of mind I needed.



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